History of the Corset

History of the Corset

History of the Corset: Achieving the perfect silhouette through clothing has long been practiced and using a corset to attain an hourglass figure has caused controversy in the past.

Here’s a brief history of this infamous undergarment.

History of the Corset: Achieving the perfect silhouette through clothing has long been practiced and using a corset to attain an hourglass figure has caused controversy in the past.

Here’s a brief history of this infamous undergarment.

The earliest known example of a corset appears on a Cretan statuette circa 1600 BCE and it is used as an outer garment and reveals the breasts.

The word “corset,” meaning a stiff laced bodice, comes from the Old French word corps, which itself is short for corpus (Latin for “body”).

Italy introduced it as an undergarment with Catherine de Medici debuting it in France during the 1500s.

It became popular in sixteenth-century Europe, reaching the pinnacle of fame during the Victorian era.

In the Elizabethan era, whalebone was incorporated so corsets could maintain a rigid look.

The most common type of corset in the 18th century was an inverted conical shape with shoulder straps and flaps at waist.

Its function was narrowing the waist, supporting the back, improving posture, and elevating the breasts.

In the late Victorian era, tight-lacing became popular to achieve an hourglass shape.

However, in the late 1800s, many warned of the health risks, such as damaged internal organs and a chance of destroying one’s fertility.

Then, during WWI, the US asked women to stop purchasing corsets to free up metal for war productions. Sales of corsets also declined due to the heavy use of girdles.

Today, it is still worn by retro-pinup enthusiasts. Additionally, high fashion designers have made them trendy again, especially as outerwear, and the rise of fetish fashion has enabled corsets to be embraced.

These days, more laid-back version of corsets exist without as much severe restrictions but with more sex appeal.

For something simple, try our Cosabella Bisou Open Frame Waist Cincher.

If lace is more your thing, look at our Black Lace Long Line Underbust Corset - Imilan.

For something more ornate, try the Black Lazer Cut Underbust Corset.

And for full-on femme fatale attitude, try our Bordelle Angela Girdle Dress.

 

La Femme Dangereuse is French for "The Dangerous Woman". Sophisticated, alluring, and distinctly French, the boutique is a warm, sultry environment with heavy inspiration from France's Art Nouveau period, mixed with modern fashion photography.

 

 

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Leave a comment
* Your email address will not be published
* Required fields